Craving Bacon? Try Portobello Mushrooms

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The next time you have a craving from bacon and eggs—why not consider a healthier alternative to fried bacon, Portobello mushrooms. In a tweet sent out Monday, Dr. Oz shared a video that showed his followers how to make mushroom bacon.

Recipe for Portobello Mushroom Bacon

  • In a medium-sized bowl, add your desired seasoning and two Portobello mushrooms (sliced lengthwise)
  • Drizzle mushrooms with olive oil; stir
  • Arrange mushrooms on a lightly-greased pan
  • Bake for 20 minutes (325 degrees Fahrenheit)
  • Flip the mushrooms with a spatula and bake for another 18 minutes or until brown

Mushroom bacon can be eaten on its own or in place of bacon (i.e. eggs and Portobello mushroom, or even a Portobello mushroom-lettuce-tomato sandwich!)

Why Mushrooms are Nutritionally Unique!

In a study published in Nutrition Today, titled, “Mushrooms—Biologically Distinct and Nutritionally Unique, Exploring a Third Food Kingdom,” researchers suggest that mushrooms (fungi) are distinct from animal and plant-derived food sources and have a unique nutrient profile.

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For example, animals ingest food while plants make their own food through photosynthesis (harnessing energy from sunlight into chemical energy). Fungi on the other hand thrive on decaying material in nature.

There are over 2,000 varieties of edible mushrooms—and researchers suggest that eating them over time can help contribute to a healthy diet.

For example, eating mushrooms is linked with higher overall consumption of grains and dark green and orange veggies (resulting in a better diet overall).

When it comes to mushrooms and health, study researchers point out that the majority of human trials surrounding edible mushrooms have focused on their anticancer effects and how it affects immune function.

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For one, studies show that polysaccharides (found in many edible mushrooms) have antitumor effects in human cell lines, these antitumor effects appear indirectly by stimulating immune function.

Researchers conclude that consumers should consume mushrooms as part of a balanced diet and even blend with animal protein.


Sources:

Feeney, M., “Mushrooms—Biologically Distinct and Nutritionally Unique, Exploring a “Third Food Kingdom,” Nutrition Today, 2014 Nov; 49(6): 301–307; published online 2014 Dec 11. doi: 10.1097/NT.0000000000000063.