Does Lemon Water Help You Poop?

Does Lemon Water Make You Poop?

Based on research and independent surveys conducted in the U.S., about four million people suffer from a gastric disorder commonly known as constipation. It causes a lot of inconvenience and discomfort and taking over-the-counter drugs like laxatives do not always provide permanent relief from this somewhat chronic ailment. So, it’s not surprising that many of us look for natural home remedies to make this condition go away for good. The most commonly available and natural remedy suggested is lemon water, but how does lemon water make you poop?

How Does Lemon Water Help You Poop?

According to experts, lemon water relieves constipation. Our body consists of almost 70% water, and it is the key ingredient needed to keep the insides of our digestive system lubricated and the softness of our stool intact.

Here’s how lemon water benefits constipation.

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1. Induces Bowel Movements

Lemons contain citric acid in large quantities. Citric acid is known to induce bowel movements and helps to remove waste matter from the colon.

2. Softens Stool

The lemon water for constipation is considered an effective remedy. It helps to soften stools and allows them to pass easily.

Having a glass of warm lemon water first thing in the morning can make a big difference in the way you fight constipation. It also helps boost your energy levels for the entire day.

3. Improves Overall Digestion

The combination of water and lemon also helps the stomach secrete hydrochloric acid. When this is combined with the bile from the liver, it helps your body absorb the essential nutrients from the food.

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It also helps you to digest your food better. As a result, it can prevent gas, a bloated stomach, and of course, constipation.

How to Relieve Constipation with Lemon Water

Take a glass of water (about 8 ounces) and squeeze a lemon into it. The best way to do it is to cut the lemon into two halves and slowly squeeze the juice into the glass of water.

If you are trying this for the first time, you might want to go a bit easy on the lemon. Try just half of it to start.

Next, warm up the lemon water in the microwave for about a minute or so. Do not add anything else to it like sugar, as it will defeat the entire purpose.

Make sure you finish this glass at least half an hour before you have your breakfast. Do this for a week, and you will start to notice a difference in your bowel movements.

The fiber in the lemon will also increase your overall fiber intake. It will also provide your digestive system with the necessary lubrication to help pass the poop without any obstacles.

Does Lemon Water Give You Diarrhea?

Too much lemon water can cause excessive urination, and it may work as a diuretic due to the presence of ascorbic acid (vitamin C). Too much of vitamin C can give you diarrhea as your body does not take more than it can use. The recommended dosage of vitamin C for males is 90 milligrams and 75 milligrams for females.

Excessive amounts of vitamin C can result in an upset stomach and liquid stools. If the lemon juice causes diarrhea, simply reduce the intake but replenish the lost fluids with normal water.

Consult your doctor if you are unsure about how much lemon water you should consume. He or she will give you the right dosage based on your body type and digestive system.

We all know that too much of anything is harmful. Eating too many starchy foods and spices can give you an upset stomach and lead to constipation.

Before you reach for those over-the-counter laxatives or prescription medication, it is worthwhile to try out the effectiveness of a natural home remedy. So, drink lemon water and experience the difference!


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Sources:

John, A., “Vitamin C & Diarrhea,” Livestrong, December 18, 2013; http://www.livestrong.com/article/465738-vitamin-c-diarrhea/, last accessed August 8, 2017.

“What Are The Side Effects of Drinking Lemon Juice?” Master Cleanse; http://lemonmastercleanse.com/what-are-the-side-effects-of-lemon-juice/, last accessed August 8, 2017.